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A report by Ben Penn in Thursday’s Bloomberg Law casts serious doubt about whether the Department of Labor will proceed with a misclassification rule before the end of this presidential term. We reported last month that the July 1 regulatory notice issued by the DOL announcing an impending regulation for determining independent contractor status under federal wage and hour law was good news for gig economy companies. Such a rule would almost certainly provide a flexible standard permitting typical gig economy businesses to classify their workers as contractors under federal law. And the cherry on top was the news (also broken by Ben Penn at Bloomberg) that the agency was aiming to fast-track the rule to be completed by year’s end, insulating it from the possibility that a new administration voted into the White House this Election Day could quickly reverse course. But yesterday’s news casts a pall over this hopefulness and brings gig economy companies back to earth with the realization that we may not see such a proposed rule anytime soon.

In an op-ed appearing in today’s N.Y. Times, Uber CEO Dara Khosrowshahi echoes what we have been saying on this blog for quite some time – that it is time for federal and state lawmakers to tear down the existing regulatory structure forcing companies to select one of two binary choices for their workers, labeling them as either employees or contractors. He advocates for a “third way,” which would permit workers to retain the flexibility they crave while being eligible for benefits provided by the hiring entities they work with.

A California state court judge just handed a potentially groundbreaking loss to gig economy companies across the state by granting an injunction forcing the two biggest ride-sharing drivers in the nation to classify their drivers as employees. A silver lining in the August 10 decision by San Francisco Superior Court Judge Ethan Schulman allows the companies 10 days before the injunction takes effect, permitting them time to appeal the ruling and perhaps to convince a higher court to put the decision on ice pending the appeal. Here are the five takeaways you need to know about today’s critical ruling.

A federal appeals court just handed Grubhub – and gig economy companies in general – a pivotal victory by narrowly interpreting an exception allowing certain transportation workers (including independent contractors) to escape arbitration agreements. The 7th Circuit Court of Appeals joined a Massachusetts federal court by ruling that gig workers cannot avoid arbitration provisions by claiming they are exempt transportation workers. But what makes this ruling the most significant yet is not just simply because it came from a federal appeals court instead of a lower district court, but because of the wide-sweeping rationale used to justify the decision. What do gig economy businesses need to know about this ruling?

The gig economy is constantly evolving, becoming more deeply entrenched in certain areas of the economy while looking to expand into others. The COVID-19 pandemic accelerated this trend by forcing changes in the behavior of individuals and businesses that is certain to outlast the health crisis.

The formal regulatory notice released yesterday is so short and sterile that the average gig economy business could be forgiven for ignoring it: “The Department of Labor is proposing a regulation for determining independent contractor status under the Fair Labor Standards Act.” But the implications are immense. Given the manner in which the current administration has treated the misclassification question, yesterday’s announcement seems to be a signal that we will soon see a federal regulation that will provide a flexible standard permitting typical gig economy businesses to classify their workers as contractors under federal law.

In a budget deal finalized today and expected to be approved by state lawmakers in a matter of days, the California state legislature has reached an agreement that will see $17.5 million allocated toward enforcement of AB-5 in the 2020-2021 budget year. Unless the state law is radically revamped by voters through a November ballot measure, gig economy businesses can expect to be under the regulatory microscope by state enforcement officials for the foreseeable future. What can gig economy businesses expect given this development?

San Francisco ratcheted up the pressure on California gig economy companies by not only filing a misclassification lawsuit against DoorDash, but promising that more such litigation was to come against other companies. Upon filing the June 16 unfair business practices lawsuit – which appears to be the first instance where a California District Attorney has taken such an action – the San Francisco District Attorney said, “I assure you that this is just the first step among many steps that our office will take…” What do gig economy companies need to know about this latest troubling development?

Gig economy workers performing food delivery services in Seattle will receive an extra $2.50 per delivery during the COVID-19 pandemic thanks to a first-in-the-nation hazard pay law unanimously passed by the City Council on Monday. The bill now heads to Mayor Jenny Durkan’s desk; she has indicated she will sign it into law this week. What do gig economy businesses need to know about this groundbreaking development?

I was able to virtually attend a session of Albany Law School’s 2020 Warren M. Anderson Legislative Seminar Series last week on “The Gig Economy,” bringing together some of the nation’s foremost thought leaders on the subject for a lively and informative panel. A recording of the May 28 hour-long session can be found here and is available for free. (Many thanks to Albany Law School for the invitation and for allowing us to share the link here.) I teamed up with Richard Rifkin, Legal Director, Government Law Center – who hosted the event – to develop this summary.

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