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On The Front Lines of Workplace LawTM

  • Fisher Phillips. WHEN YOU HAVE TO DRAW A LINE IN THE SAND.

    Employers often must take a stand: in court, with employees and unions, with competitors. Fisher Phillips has the experience and resolve to back you up. That’s why some of the savviest employers come to us to handle their toughest cases.

  • Fisher Phillips. WHEN YOU HAVE TO PROTECT YOUR BOTTOM LINE.

    Sometimes employers must send a powerful message, and the right messenger can make all the difference. Fisher Phillips has the experience and credibility to make your message clear. That’s why some of the savviest employers come to us to handle their toughest negotiations.

  • Fisher Phillips. BECAUSE SOMEONE ALWAYS CROSSES THE LINE.

    Whether it’s misconduct by a current employee or unfair competition from a former employee, someone is always crossing the line. Fisher Phillips has the experience and judgment to help you determine the right response. That’s why some of the savviest employers come to us with their toughest employee problems.

  • Fisher Phillips. WHEN EVERYTHING IS ON THE (PICKET) LINE.

    Union relations and union organizing campaigns can present the most profound challenges for your business. Fisher Phillips has the experience and tenacity to help you get the results you need. That’s why some of the savviest employers come to us to handle their toughest union issues.

  • ATLANTA (August 15, 2018) – Fisher Phillips announced today that 95 attorneys have been selected by their peers for inclusion in The Best Lawyers in America 2019®. 

  • It’s hard to keep up with all the recent changes to labor and employment law. While the law always seems to evolve at a rapid pace, there have been an unprecedented number of changes for the past few years—and this past month was no exception.

  • After nearly 10 years of start-and-stop efforts on Beacon Hill, Governor Charlie Baker signed “An Act Relative to Economic Development in the Commonwealth” on Friday evening, which includes sweeping changes to the way the Commonwealth treats noncompetition agreements.

  • In a sweeping victory for labor unions, Missouri voters overwhelmingly rejected a right-to-work law which sought to ban unions from requiring union fees as a condition of employment in Missouri.

  • On July 18, 2018, the New York City Temporary Schedule Change Law took effect. As we previously reported, under the new law, eligible employees have a right to temporary changes to their work schedule for certain “personal events”, up to two times a year, for one business day per event. A temporary change means an adjustment to the employee’s usual schedule, and can include shifting work hours, swapping shifts, working remotely, or unpaid or paid leave. The employee can request a temporary schedule change if the employee needs to provide care to a minor child or care recipient or to attend a legal proceeding for public benefits, as well as for any other permissible use under the City’s Safe and Sick Time Act. Our previous alert contains additional details regarding the requirements under this new law. 

  • Today, the California Supreme Court issued its ruling in Troester v. Starbucks Corporation, and departed from federal law’s more employer-friendly version of the de minimis rule, which it characterized as stuck in the “industrial world.”

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