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Were you one of the lucky few to “win” one of the 85,000 H-1B visa numbers in this year’s random selection process held by the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) lottery? The USCIS held its annual lottery drawing on April 11, 2018 to pick the congressionally mandated 65,000 Bachelor’s cap and 20,000 Master’s cap petitions that will be processed this year for the 2019 fiscal year. The agency will begin sending out receipt notices for the selected petitions.  As in years past, the USCIS will reject and return all unselected petitions with the uncashed filing fee checks.   

Fisher Phillips attorneys had the pleasure and privilege of presenting with Jingo Lu, Esquire, a lawyer from China, at a recent International Employers Forum event in Washington D.C.  Jingbo kindly accepted our invitation to answer some of questions about employment relationships in China. More particularly, we will delve into how employment relationships may be legally terminated in China, a jurisdiction that requires employers to have cause to terminate an employee.

The national and international spotlight on pay equity is getting brighter by the day.  By way of illustration, this post explores two laws that took effect on January 1, 2018, one in California and one in Iceland, and a wage equity ordinance in Philadelphia that is currently being challenged on constitutional grounds.  These are just examples of the much larger trend at the local and state level in the United States, as demonstrated by the Fisher Phillips Pay Equity Map. This trend can be seen around the world as more countries introduce some form of pay equity measures.  Overall, the major question that all companies should be

In late September, my colleague, Brian Ellixson, published a post concerning the start of a power swing, from France’s historically employee-friendly labor regime to a somewhat more employer-friendly system. Indeed, although French employment law still largely favors employees over employers, we are already seeing the beginnings of a potential sea change in the French labor market, both in the context of employer’s reliance on the new labor reforms and the resulting prospects of large-scale growth in the labor market.

Tags: France

Yesterday, IG Metall, Germany’s largest metal union, entered into an agreement with employers in the state of Baden-Württemberg that allows for a 28-hour work week for its members.  The two-year deal covers 900,000 employees in the metals and electrical industries in the southwestern state that is home to such prominent employers as Daimler AG and Robert Bosch GmbH.

Tags: Germany

New Zealand’s Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern and partner Clark Gayford are expecting their first child in June 2018, just shy of the July 1 effective date of a new law extending the period of paid parental leave from 18 to 22 weeks. The Parental Leave and Employment Protection Amendment Bill, passed on November 30, 2017 extends the period of paid parental leave from 18 to 26 weeks by July 1, 2020. The government’s expressed aim is to support working families, reduce financial stress, and to allow for more bonding time for care givers who are not in a position to take any unpaid leave.

When a US company decides to hire an employee in another country the question of whether to send the applicant an offer letter inevitably arises. Sending an offer letter prior to the final contract is normal practice in the US.  But this is not the case in other jurisdictions, and for good reason. 

The International Employers Forum welcomed Anna Cozzi, Esquire, from Daverio & Florio law firm, to join a panel of international lawyers, including my colleague William Wright, to speak about changes in employment law around the world.  Fisher Phillips thanks Anna for kindly accepting our invitation to answer a few questions about the new smart working arrangements in Italy for the Cross Border Blog.

Last month, Ontario passed the Fair Workplaces, Better Jobs Act, 2017 (the “Act”).  The Act was passed in response to the Changing Workplaces Review’s conclusion that there is a “need for reform of employment standards and labor relation legislation . . . to provide protection to vulnerable workers and those in precarious work situations.”  The Act aims to satisfy that need with the following immediate changes to Ontario law:

Tags: Canada

The Supreme Court just permitted the president’s latest travel ban – dubbed Travel Ban 3.0 – to be fully implemented while the litigation regarding the policy proceeds through the federal appellate court system. The Court’s December 4 ruling is the latest twist in the saga that currently impacts the residents of six predominantly Muslim countries.

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