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On Tuesday, June 30, 2020, the Council of the European Union announced its list of “safe countries” from which the EU will allow entry by business and tourism travelers. The list will be reviewed every two weeks and may be updated if the coronavirus situation in other countries improves or worsens, the E.U. statement said. 

As some European Union countries begin to open up to visitors from other EU countries and the border-free Schengen zone, the EU is now developing plans for opening up to business and pleasure travelers from around the world – but with a few notable exceptions. According to widespread media reports, the EU is strongly considering continuing its ban for travelers from the United States, Brazil, and Russia.

As of June 15, 2020, non-essential retailers in the UK may reopen after months of being shut down. The government has published guidance for employers, employees, and self-employed persons on how to keep their workplaces “COVID-Secure.” 

Mexico’s General Health Council (CSG) will add industries to the list of essential businesses effective June 1, 2020. The Mexican government is also expected to issue mandatory measures for all businesses to follow as a return-to-work requirement. 

As an increasing number of countries are moving toward reopening their economies, many global employers must decide whether to require their employees to undergo COVID-19 tests before they can return to work. Before implementing a testing requirement, employers should carefully consider the potential for unintended consequences, such as discrimination based on testing results and the unreliability of certain tests.

As the lockdown measures adopted by governments around the world begin to take a toll on companies’ revenues, some employers are exploring their options to terminate employees. Singapore is one of the most employer-friendly jurisdictions in Asia, but employers should still be mindful of various issues when terminating employees there. 

The Japanese government declared a state of emergency on April 7, 2020 affecting Tokyo, Kanagawa, Saitama, Chiba, Osaka, Hyogo, and Fukuoka. The state of emergency goes into effect April 8 and lasts until May 6. The prefectural governments have the power to determine their own measures, which are expected to follow those taken by the Tokyo Metropolitan Government.

Singapore, like many other countries, is amending its laws and regulations in light of the world-wide coronavirus pandemic. Here are answers to some common questions affecting employers with operations or interests in Singapore.

Following advice from the Ontario Chief Medical Officer of Health, on April 3, 2020, Ontario updated the list of essential businesses that can remain open after 11:59 p.m. on April 4, 2020. Businesses that are not on the list of essential businesses must close their physical locations. Teleworking and online commerce is permitted for all businesses.

Australia, like many other countries, is amending its laws and regulations in light of the world-wide coronavirus pandemic. Here are answers to some common questions affecting employers with operations or interests in Australia. Please note that the situation changes daily if not hourly, so make sure to always check the latest information published by the national and local governments.

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