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Posts by Greg Grisham

The Gig Economy has caught the attention of at least one presidential candidate who has unveiled a plan called “A New Rising Tide” which, among other things, calls for greater protections for gig economy workers.

Last week, the French Court of Appeals dealt another blow to global gig businesses, ruling that the agreement between Uber and a former driver was “an employment contract,” because the former driver was “dependent” on Uber “for work.” In so ruling, the court rejected the company’s long held position that it is “merely a service provider with drivers who are self-employed, able to work when and where they want.” The decision overturned a lower court ruling in favor of Uber.

The British government announced workplace reforms yesterday (which include new legislation) that will impact employers including gig economy companies, although the reforms do not seek a “radical reworking of existing business models.” The reforms set forth in the “Good Work Plan” are based on an independent review of modern working practices conducted by Matthew Taylor (“Taylor’s Review”), chief executive of the Royal Society of Arts. Taylor’s Review was commissioned by the Prime Minister, and the Reforms bring forward 51 of Taylor’s 53 recommendations.

Frequent readers of our blog will recall our post from earlier this year where we referenced the efforts of gig economy company Handy to lobby legislators in a number of states to pass laws protecting the independent contractor status of individuals working in the online digital marketplace. That effort was recently successful in Tennessee.

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