Main Menu

Gig Employer Blog

Posts from July 2018.

It is no secret that employers struggle to identify, hire, and retain top talent. Given technological advances and increased globalization, the need to access and hire specialized talent in an efficient and cost-effective manner will likely only increase in the future. Companies may also struggle with determining the best staffing solutions as they enter new industries, obtain new customers, or try to keep up with and manage their growth. Notably, companies also struggle to develop initiatives that allow them to identify and retain specialized experts on a short term or on demand basis to tackle difficult but short-term problems. For companies in need of short-term specialized expertise, professional learning networks offer an on-demand model for access to diverse talent pools that do not exist in-house and often times would not make sense for companies to expend resources building and maintaining on a long-term basis.

When you think of the gig economy, many of us think of Uber, Task Rabbit, or some other gig shrouded in an entrepreneurial-type aspiration. You think of a person setting their own hours, working for themselves, maybe stringing together several “gigs” to make that ideal work schedule and being their own boss.  Well, Wonolo, and companies like it, may be changing this paradigm. 

Although the document itself is fairly dense and complex, specifically focusing on the home-care registry industry, the Labor Department’s latest field assistance bulletin could provide a helpful clue to gig economy companies about how the agency could regulate the concept of misclassification on a broader scale. The July 13 document tilts the scales back towards an even playing field, which should be music to the ears of gig economy businesses across the country.

You remember the game-changing, earth-shattering, monumental decision from the California Supreme Court a few months ago that fundamentally changes the test to determine whether your workers are independent contractors or employees, don’t you? For those who had put it out of their minds hoping it was all just a nightmare, here’s the quick summary: rather than applying a balancing test that took into a number of factors, the California Supreme Court said that hiring entities need to prove that all of their workers satisfy the “ABC test” in order to properly classify them as employees. 

Although legal tests for determining employment status have taken center stage with numerous recent high-profile cases, lurking in the background is a question that may also have implications beyond the gig economy space: what happens if and when traditional “manager” roles are filled by automated systems?

Recent Posts

Category List

Archives

Back to Page