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Posts tagged California Legislature.

As we previously discussed in this blog, last year Governor Jerry Brown signed legislation to prevent employers from asking about salary history information. That legislation, Assembly Bill 168 (Eggman), went into effect on January 1, 2018 and prohibited public and private employers from seeking or relying upon the salary history of applicants for employment.

February 16 was the deadline to introduce new bills in the California Legislature.  By that date, nearly 2,200 bills were introduced.  While that may seem like a staggering amount of legislative proposals (especially for a legislative body with only 120 members), this number is consistent with the volume of bills that have been introduced in recent years.

We’ll be tracking this legislation all year and updating you on key developments. 

As we discussed back in January, sexual harassment appears to be the hot topic for the California State Legislature’s 2018 session. This is certainly not a surprise, as issues related to sexual harassment and the #MeToo movement have dominated discussion across all industries and sectors of business, entertainment, sports, and politics.

Immigration has been a major flashpoint between California and the Trump Administration during the past year.  In 2017, the California Legislature passed significant legislation impacting how California employers deal with federal immigration authorities.  These actions appeared to put California on a collision course with the federal government, with California employers stuck squarely in the middle.  A recent escalation in rhetoric between state and federal officials may portend that such a collision may be imminent.

One of the more controversial bills introduced in the California Legislature in 2017, which was eligible to be brought up this month, has been held and will not move forward.

The California Legislature reconvened on January 3 to begin the second year of the 2017-18 legislative session.  As anticipated, sexual harassment appears to be the “hot topic” for the Legislature this year, with nearly a half-dozen bills introduced to address this issue in the first two days of the legislative session alone.

On October 14, Governor Brown signed AB 1008 to prohibit most public and private employers with five or more employees from asking applicants about criminal conviction histories until after a conditional offer of employment has been made. The new law will become effective January 1, 2018.

It’s a time of high-drama in Sacramento.  With less than two weeks to go in the legislative year, many of the hot-button labor and employment bills we have been tracking all year await final action.  Many bills are significantly amended in the last days of session as stakeholders scramble to get those final votes to the get the bill to the Governor’s desk.  So keep close track of these bills because things can change in a heartbeat!

When the Legislature reconvenes from its summer recess on August 21, it will have only a few short weeks to finish work on legislation for this year.  All bills must be passed and sent to Governor Brown by September 15, who will have until October 15 to sign or veto bills.

As introduced, Senate Bill 396 by Senator Ricardo Lara (D-Bell Gardens) dealt with medical residence training programs.  However, recently the contents of the bill were stripped out and replaced with new and unrelated language (a procedure referred to as a “gut and amend” in legislative lingo).  The new language proposes to expand California employers’ obligations regarding sexual harassment training.

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