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Workplace Safety and Health Law Blog

Posts in unions use safety.

Employers rarely appreciate how strongly workplace safety affects employee attitudes about the Company or how devastatingly a union or other third party can use safety to destroy a Company's image. Conversely, executives can use a robust safety culture to increase employee satisfaction and productivity ... and it's the right thing to do. Don't allow a third party to use safety issues to destroy your company. This two-part article describes safety-based Corporate campaigns relying on safety and common sense preventive measures.

Part II of our Post on Corporate Campaigns using safety to harm a company's reputation, and in the case of Tesla, compel the Company to give in to Union demands. This part concludes the discussion by describing the variety of attack strategies and proposing commonsense steps to improve one's safety culture and deny a group's ability to destroy your company's reputation using safety as a club.

I recently blogged about the debate on CEO and employee pay ratios. I urged employers to seize the high ground and decide what their attitude is as to their “responsibility” is to their employees. I’m a pragmatist. I believe that in the long run, employers will prosper (and avoid the need for my services) by consciously focusing on improving their employees’ lives. I’ve made it clear that I do not believe that employers are social workers. Your role is to make money. Competition and drive is good for society. However, just as we develop business plans and marketing strategies, we must develop plans to treat our employees “fairly.” “Fairness” is a spongey concept, and one often high jacked by unions and the government. But it is also the best determinant of employee satisfaction. The term defies the quantification that my analytical nature desires, but somehow employees recognize “fairness.” They don’t expect the highest wages, the best benefits, the most engaging atmosphere, but they do expect to be treated fairly. We ignore this expectation at our own peril!

We’re going to comment on the numerous policies and rules which must be revised because of the NLRB’s many changes last year; especially during December 2014. Today, we’ll briefly discuss email.

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