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Workplace Safety and Health Law Blog

Posts in manufacturing.

Part II of our Post on Corporate Campaigns using safety to harm a company's reputation, and in the case of Tesla, compel the Company to give in to Union demands. This part concludes the discussion by describing the variety of attack strategies and proposing commonsense steps to improve one's safety culture and deny a group's ability to destroy your company's reputation using safety as a club.

Last week I was honored to be named a Top Author in J.D. Supra Readers’ Choice Awards. I write a great deal when I should probably be billing, but you guys seem to enjoy my stuff, so thanks! However, I often read an article or have an experience which merits discussion, but I don’t have the time to prepare my preferred detailed analysis.

Every week we see reports of amputations and deaths or OSHA Press Releases about big dollar penalties relating to guarding, lock-out and training. Should we conclude that many employers don’t care or that employees themselves are usually at fault? Probably not.

 

Come January 1, 2015, OSHA’s newly announced Recordkeeping changes will cause the most problems for manufacturers because the amputation reporting requirements will trigger more OSHA inspections, but the LARGEST group affected will be auto dealers. Traditionally retail new and used car dealers have not had to maintain the OSHA 300 injury and illness log and post the annual Summary from February 1 through April 30.

On July 15, 2014, Thomas Galassi, OSHA’s Director of Enforcement Programs, released a memorandum addressed to all OSHA regional administrators regarding OSHA’s Temporary Worker Initiative—a program developed to increase the agency’s focus on the safety of temporary workers. The purpose of the memo was to clarify the responsibilities of staffing agencies and host employees and to remind OSHA field staff of the enforcement policy with respect to temporary workers.

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