Main Menu

Workplace Safety and Health Law Blog

Posts in Recordkeeping.

Let’s be honest. Many of us object to any expansion of OSHA workplace injury recordkeeping because it’s burdensome, doesn’t help develop a safety culture, and we expect the Administration to misuse the data. That said, there are some good aspects of OSHA’s proposed Final Rule, and some of the worry is unfounded.

Auto Dealers Should Relax.

Our first client back in the 1940s was an auto dealer, so we at Fisher Phillips are fond of and track the ...

OSHA issued its final rule on Recordkeeping and Reporting Requirements on September 11, 2014, to take effect on January 1, 2015. Changes include new requirements to report amputations, loss of an eye, and hospitalizations of one (1) or more employees within 24 hours. Federal OSHA did not previously require the reporting of amputations or loss of an eye and did not require reporting of employee hospitalizations unless three (3) employees were hospitalized as a result of a single incident. The new reports, similar to fatality reports, will be posted on OSHA's website. See OSHA's webpage for additional information - https://www.osha.gov/recordkeeping2014/records.html.

I support OSHA’s temporary worker focus. Employers need to take more steps to ensure that temporary employees don’t fall through the cracks and do not receive adequate safety training.

Going into 2014, OSHA is continuing its focus of inspecting and, when alleged violations found, citing employers under its recordkeeping standard. Proper recordkeeping has become more critical to employers since OSHA recently issued a proposed rule to publish, in certain cases, the injury and illness data provided by employers.

Recent Posts

Category List

Archives

Back to Page