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Workplace Safety and Health Law Blog

Contractors cannot rely on the site owner to guarantee the safety of contractor employees, just as owners must take steps to ensure that contractors perform work safely and in compliance with OSHA standards.

Every year, the CSEA competition results in a lengthy list of construction safety best practices gleaned from the numerous competitors for the Construction Safety Excellence Awards. Treat this year's 44-page booklet as a smorgasbord of safety ideas. Pick a few that might improve or enliven your culture and safety efforts.

Although numerous OSHA leadership positions remain unfilled, OSHA has announced a new Director for the OSHA Directorate of Construction.

The majority of workplace shooting deaths could have been prevented if individuals had been present who possessed even the most basic trauma/stop-the-bleeding training and equipment. We provide links to approved providers and background on the Stop the Bleed movement.

We have witnessed unsettling global developments in infectious diseases, such as antibiotic-resistant infections, the resurgence of almost eradicated diseases, increasingly nerve-wracking pandemics arising in East Asia, and an expansion of tropical diseases to the U.S. mainland. Not surprisingly, employers are being forced to deal with a variety of workplace infections and illnesses. All employers would be wise to educate and prepare for the occasional odd disease challenge, much as do healthcare employers.

Employers are pleased with today's Final Rule eliminating some of the more burdensome electronic submission requirements for workplace injuries and illness data, but now employers need to meet the existing dates for completion and posting of data, as well as electronic submission of 300A Summary information. But what about states who have not yet adopted Fed-OSHA's electronic submission requirements and California, which has passed its own law?

As we remember and honor those that fell on 9/11 and in the years since, we should also commit ourselves and our businesses to better plan for disasters. Indeed, in recognition of the beginning of the storm season, September is National Preparedness Month, with OSHA, FEMA and others mounting campaigns to get businesses (and individuals) to pause, do a What-if Analysis, and then take steps to protect employees, maintain business operations, or restore them.

I enjoyed participating on July 11 with my friend Brian Edwards PE of Conversion Technologies in an FP Webinar on Combustible Compliance. The archived webinar is an excellent overview of combustible dust challenges. I prepared this handout as an accompaniment to Brian's slides. The piece represents the lawyer's practical observations on this thorny compliance issues and compliments Brian's slides and presentation.

Part II of our Post on Corporate Campaigns using safety to harm a company's reputation, and in the case of Tesla, compel the Company to give in to Union demands. This part concludes the discussion by describing the variety of attack strategies and proposing commonsense steps to improve one's safety culture and deny a group's ability to destroy your company's reputation using safety as a club.

Our California offices reported that local governments are provided N 95 dust masks to citizens because of the wild fires.  Such masks may not actually help all users and the smoke and particulate may not exceed permissible levels. Nevertheless, these masks do often provide comfort when exposed to dusty conditions which are uncomfortable but do not present a hazard.

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