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Workplace Safety and Health Law Blog

Posts from March 2019.

The popular new Podcast series, Dr. Death, provides employers an opportunity to analyze how they would handle problematic reference requests and embarrassing public information. The fascinating podcast series follows a Dallas area neurosurgeon who may have killed or maimed 33 of his 38 patients. The series focuses on why various parties did not candidly share information about the surgeon and is critical of almost every aspect of the organizations' public and internal responses. Listen and ask yourself, "could you have done better?"

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has conducted an inspection of your plant after one of your employees amputated part of his finger trying to clean around a sprocket with the machine still running.  OSHA issues a serious citation to your company for a machine guarding violation. 

We have witnessed unsettling global developments in infectious diseases, such as antibiotic-resistant infections, the resurgence of almost eradicated diseases, increasingly nerve-wracking pandemics arising in East Asia, and an expansion of tropical diseases to the U.S. mainland. Not surprisingly, employers are being forced to deal with a variety of workplace infections and illnesses. All employers would be wise to educate and prepare for the occasional odd disease challenge, much as do healthcare employers.

CFOs and CEOS will be the ones held accountable if hurricanes, floods, wild fires and other natural disasters harm shareholder value. California wild fires pushing utility PG&E to bankruptcy and the devastation of Texas chemical plants and Puerto Rican pharmaceutical plants proves that businesses need "What-if" committees to evaluate even the effects of climate change in their business continuity and disaster preparedness planning. 

An accident happens at your workplace, and an employee is injured.  During the hectic response, incorrect information funnels its way up to the safety director or person charged with notifying OSHA of reportable injuries and accidents, and that person is told that it looks like the employee’s finger has been amputated or is admitted for in-patient hospitalization.  Attempting to meet the statutory deadline, the safety director then reports to OSHA that an amputation or in-patient hospitalization has occurred. 

According to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), motor vehicle crashes cost employers $60 billion annually in medical care, legal expenses, property damage, and lost productivity. Motor vehicle crashes are responsible for more worker fatalities than any other cause, including machine guarding and lock-out tag-out violations.

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