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Posts from April 2016.

Employers have become accustom to the periodic unfounded EEOC charges and may not treat them as seriously as a retaliation claim or litigation.  However, the EEOC continues to change its procedures in ways which makes it more burdensome for employers to respond and may require employers to obtain more legal guidance.

Based on the U.S. success in containing Ebola last year, we have reaon to believe that should this terrifying disease reappear, the U.S. will minimize its domestic effects.  Moreover research may even come up with better treatments or vaccines.  Thus, I do not blame President Obama for recently shifting money from Ebola prevention and response to Zika.  Ideally, if government were not so bloated, inefficient and driven by entitlement spending, there would be money for both, but we live in a flawed political world.

We just completed the second of two Fisher Phillips webinars including panelists and contributors who were active and former Department of Homeland Security, Secret Service, and other law enforcement professionals.  We solicited questions and concerns from employers and used the panel discussions and preparation to develop more effective practices to prevent and respond to workplace violence.  (March 29 archived webinar part 1)

2015 brought more changes to the OSHA enforcement landscape than we’ve seen in the last 30 years.

A judge’s ruling in December that Fed-OSHA could seek abatement of alleged hazards at every location operated by an employer, even if OSHA had never inspected those sites, surprised us all. See our previous article on Sec. of Labor v. Central Transport, LLC. The Central Transport, LLC ruling is part of what appears to be Fed-OSHA’s attempt to expand its enforcement reach even though its resources are limited. Given a tighter budget, the agency wants to remain effective while completing fewer inspections.

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