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Workplace Safety and Health Law Blog

Posts from November 2014.

Now that you have had some practice on what illnesses and injuries should be recorded on the OSHA recordkeeping logs, let's examine the most common errors we see when actually filling out the logs properly with that injury and illness information.

We are again running a Biggest Loser Contest among our 31 offices and will award prizes, beginning at $1,000, to individuals who lose the most weight. I do not watch reality shows and am generally cynical about such programs. However, I am happily eating my own words. Employees are having fun with the contest and the competition has generated a lot of camaraderie and playful competition. When I visit one office, someone will only half-jokingly ask me to leave Donuts on the desk of one of their “weight loss foes” in the next office I visit. Folks have regaled me with their elaborate preparation and routine for winning the contest. Their approach reminded me of my pre-race and pre-fight preparation of a few years ago.

Come January 1, 2015, OSHA’s newly announced Recordkeeping changes will cause the most problems for manufacturers because the amputation reporting requirements will trigger more OSHA inspections, but the LARGEST group affected will be auto dealers. Traditionally retail new and used car dealers have not had to maintain the OSHA 300 injury and illness log and post the annual Summary from February 1 through April 30.

How did you do last week? Time to brush up on your new cases rules?

This week's scenarios assume that the injury or illness is a new case and is work related, focusing on the general OSHA recordkeeping criteria.

How did you do last week? Time to brush up on your work relatedness rules?

This week's quiz focuses on new cases. Only new cases of injury or illness must be recorded on the OSHA log. OSHA states that an employer must consider an illness or injury to be a new case if: (1) The employee has not previously experienced a recorded injury or illness of the same type that affects the same part of the body, or (2) The employee previously experienced a recorded injury or illness of the same type that affected the same part of the body but had recovered completely (all signs and symptoms had disappeared) from the previous injury or illness and an event or exposure in the work environment caused the signs or symptoms to reappear.

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