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Workplace Safety and Health Law Blog

Posts from September 2014.

Let’s be honest. Many of us object to any expansion of OSHA workplace injury recordkeeping because it’s burdensome, doesn’t help develop a safety culture, and we expect the Administration to misuse the data. That said, there are some good aspects of OSHA’s proposed Final Rule, and some of the worry is unfounded.

Auto Dealers Should Relax.

Our first client back in the 1940s was an auto dealer, so we at Fisher Phillips are fond of and track the ...

On September 4, the Whistleblower Protection Advisory Committee (WPAC) unanimously voted in favor of several revisions to the OSH Act that would expand protection for workers who are retaliated against for raising health and safety concerns at their workplace.

OSHA issued its final rule on Recordkeeping and Reporting Requirements on September 11, 2014, to take effect on January 1, 2015. Changes include new requirements to report amputations, loss of an eye, and hospitalizations of one (1) or more employees within 24 hours. Federal OSHA did not previously require the reporting of amputations or loss of an eye and did not require reporting of employee hospitalizations unless three (3) employees were hospitalized as a result of a single incident. The new reports, similar to fatality reports, will be posted on OSHA's website. See OSHA's webpage for additional information - https://www.osha.gov/recordkeeping2014/records.html.

In a recent decision, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 6th Circuit dismissed the mining industry’s challenge to the Mine Safety and Health Administration’s (“MSHA”) recently revised pattern of violations (“POV”) rule concluding that the Court lacked authority to hear the claim.

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