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Wage and Hour Laws Blog

USDOL's recent Field Assistance Bulletin outlines the factors to be considered when the agency is evaluating independent contractor status.

Does the FLSA apply in this scenario? Take our quiz, and check back for the discussion post.

After 80 years with the USDOL, the FLSA needs a shakeup. The problem is that, even as we anxiously await proposed regulations from the current agency and contemplate how things might be under a potential new one, it’s the 80-year-old law that needs change, and not just because it is outdated.

Changes from USDOL have been numerous and fast paced. Take a second to look back on what has already happened in the federal wage and hour world in 2018, and what is yet to come.

Before forging ahead with summer hires, employers should carefully evaluate state law restrictions to determine whether they overlap and/or supplement the FLSA and, either way, how they apply depending on a multitude of factors that can go well-beyond just the minor’s age.

Hiring minors can be daunting in any state given the FLSA's child labor restrictions that vary depending on the individual's age, the work contemplated, and even the local public school's schedule.

The USDOL has added two more wage-hour items to its plate: child labor and regular rate.

From FLSA enforcement programs to compliance resources, the USDOL has stepped up and provided timely guidance that ultimately can benefit everyone, if employers understand what the various materials do and do not say.

It's tax time, and perhaps the only thing worse than completing your tax returns is finding out that you're being audited.  But not all audits are bad.  Under the FLSA, conducting an internal audit of your company's pay practices can actually even be beneficial to your business.

The U.S. Supreme Court has taken a fresh look at how courts analyze FLSA exemptions.  It concluded that there is no basis to "narrowly construe" the statutory language regarding FLSA exemptions, and thus, held that service advisors employed by automobile dealerships can qualify for the Section 13(b)(10) exemption from federal overtime.

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