Main Menu

Wage and Hour Laws Blog

Posts in Timekeeping.

Perhaps the conditions are right for a coalition drawn from employees, employers, and government representatives to wrestle the FLSA into the 21st century.

One aspect of the U.S. Labor Department's revised compensation requirements for the federal Fair Labor Standards Act's Section 13(a)(1) "white collar" exemptions could mean that some employers will have to keep records of at least some of these exempt employees' hours worked.

Is the U.S. Labor Department correct in suggesting that timekeeping can easily be accomplished via a "simple" timekeeping-by-exceptions system?

The Fifth Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals has rejected an employee's claim to have been entitled to FLSA overtime compensation for unreported hours worked.

The Third Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals has ruled that employees who receive the "predominant benefit" of a meal break are not entitled to have the break treated as FLSA worktime.

The responses to our earlier poll suggest that many employers maintain records of the hours worked by their exempt employees.

Should an employer keep records of the time worked by employees who qualify for an FLSA minimum-wage and/or overtime exemption?

Does the FLSA give employees a right to "predictable scheduling"?

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled today that the time non-exempt employees spent in connection with an end-of-workday security screening before leaving the premises did not count as FLSA worktime.

Buried in the U.S. Labor Department's publication relating to "Establishing a Minimum Wage for Contractors" is a potential recordkeeping landmine.

Recent Posts

Category List

Archives

Back to Page