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Wage and Hour Laws Blog

Posts in Remedies.

After more than a year, USDOL has finally disclosed at least some information concerning its "policy" of sometimes insisting that an employer pay liquidated damages as a condition of resolving alleged FLSA violations at the investigative stage.

The U.S. Department of Labor's internal "policy" regarding FLSA liquidated damages remains unclear and undisclosed.

The U.S. Labor Department's final "Guidance" concerning President Obama's July 2014 "Fair Pay and Safe Workplaces" Executive Order suggests that the agency might be applying an improper standard in determining what is a "willful" violation of the FLSA.

The U.S. Labor Department reports that a temporary-staffing employee has received $1,152 in back-wages and unspecified "other damages" for what it contended was a violation of the FLSA's Section 7(r).

A recent court decision underscores that employers should not take a "close enough is good enough" attitude where the timely payment of FLSA-required wages is concerned.

A Texas federal court has ordered the U.S. Labor Department to pay more than $560,000 in attorney's fees, paralegal fees, and travel expenses growing out of litigation under the FLSA.

A quick survey of recent court decisions suggests that the "de minimis" worktime concept is still alive and well.

The Third Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals is the latest to embrace broader and more employee-friendly federal principles in deciding who might be a successor to FLSA liability.

The "Payroll Fraud Prevention Act of 2013" would amend the FLSA to impose new prohibitions, requirements, and penalties relating to categorizing a worker as being either an employee or a non-employee, but some changes would be of even-broader impact.

A decision by the Fifth Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals illustrates and exacerbates the morass into which the calculation of overtime pay has descended in so-called "failed exemption" cases under the FLSA.

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