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Wage and Hour Laws Blog

Posts in Recordkeeping.

The U.S. Labor Department's latest proposed "worker classification" survey is an indication that the "Right to Know" initiative will include exemption-related disclosure requirements.

We have taken the position that the Labor Department's proposed collection of information should not be cleared, approved, or undertaken.

After 38 days, the U.S. Labor Department still has not provided a copy.

The U.S. Labor Department apparently intends to reinvigorate its so-called "Right to Know" initiative.

A recent California case supports the view that there is nothing inherently unlawful about the proper rounding of employee worktime.

Now that the election is behind us, employers should consider what they might anticipate in the field of wage-hour law.

It is not likely that Alan's time between calls would be found to be worktime under the federal Fair Labor Standards Act.

Is an on-call employee's time between calls likely to be deemed to be "hours worked" under the federal Fair Labor Standards Act?

It is still necessary to take wage-hour compliance into account even when one embraces a "flexible workplace" philosophy.

Our earlier post about the U.S. Labor Department's position on unauthorized extensions of rest breaks has generated additional comments and questions.

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