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An employer should not rely simply upon even long-held conventional wisdom where the FLSA is concerned.

Employers should avoid the colloquialisms "current" and "in arrears" in describing the timing of employees' wage payments.

Some employers have adopted one or more of a variety of percentage-based approaches to dealing with the FLSA overtime ramifications of bonuses.

There appears to be some misunderstanding or uncertainty about particular aspects of how an employer should undertake to evaluate whether and to what extent the U.S. Labor Department's proposed increase in the "white collar"-exemption's salary threshold would affect employee compensation.

Employers are permitted to take cost-control concerns into account in designing a variety of new pay plans for employees who become non-exempt as the result of revisions in the U.S. Labor Department's exemption regulations.

Management should be thinking NOW about alternative ways to pay employees who become non-exempt as the result of revisions in the U.S. Labor Department's exemption regulations.

The FLSA's Section 7(i) might provide an alternative for retailers for whom the coming "white collar" exemption revisions present difficulties.

The U.S. Labor Department's "fluctuating workweek" interpretative provision does not warrant the fly-specking veneration that some courts have been giving it.

Misunderstandings about the FLSA sometimes lead employers unintentionally to pay more than the law requires.

A recent $4 million settlement between the U.S. Labor Department and a Texas healthcare employer highlights a recurring overtime issue under the FLSA.

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