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Wage and Hour Laws Blog

Posts in Overtime Compensation.

The USDOL recently announced that it will continue its Payroll Audit Independent Determination (PAID) program, and wasted no time beginning its efforts to further educate employers and attorneys about the benefits of the program.

After 80 years with the USDOL, the FLSA needs a shakeup. The problem is that, even as we anxiously await proposed regulations from the current agency and contemplate how things might be under a potential new one, it’s the 80-year-old law that needs change, and not just because it is outdated.

The U.S. Supreme Court has taken a fresh look at how courts analyze FLSA exemptions.  It concluded that there is no basis to "narrowly construe" the statutory language regarding FLSA exemptions, and thus, held that service advisors employed by automobile dealerships can qualify for the Section 13(b)(10) exemption from federal overtime.

USDOL's Payroll Audit Independent Determination (PAID) pilot program is meant to provide employers with the framework to proactively resolve potential FLSA claims. Nonetheless, on the whole, it seems that the benefits and risks are not particularly distinguishable from an investigation.

Whether the FLSA effectively prohibits an employer from imposing certain costs (such as for purchasing a uniform) on an employee depends on a variety of factors, including whether it is cost-prohibitive in the particular circumstances.

Our post addresses FLSA topics that might be among the most-pressing in the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey.

Employers should take steps to lower the risk of a mistaken back-pay ruling in an FLSA "failed exemption" lawsuit.

The U.S. House of Representatives is considering legislation that would amend the FLSA to permit private-sector employers to offer compensatory time off in lieu of monetary overtime compensation.

The U.S. Department of Labor should disavow and withdraw statements made in 2011 that were intended to undercut the use of fluctuating-workweek pay plans under the FLSA.

Employers should keep in mind that an applicable state law might affect whether a "fluctuating workweek" arrangement is permitted for workers in that jurisdiction.

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