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Wage and Hour Laws Blog

Posts in Litigation.

Employers should be encouraged to make voluntary back-wage payments with confidence that doing so will terminate their FLSA liability.

The U.S. Labor Department's final "Guidance" concerning President Obama's July 2014 "Fair Pay and Safe Workplaces" Executive Order suggests that the agency might be applying an improper standard in determining what is a "willful" violation of the FLSA.

The Kentucky Court of Appeals has ruled that neither collective actions nor class actions are authorized under the Kentucky Wages and Hours Act.

A District of Columbia federal judge has scuttled key aspects of the U.S. Labor Department's revised rule that was designed to extend the FLSA's minimum-wage and overtime requirements to many previously-exempt home care workers starting January 1, 2015.

President Obama's "immigration accountability" initiative might well result in increased claims by or on behalf of the affected individuals that they have not been paid in compliance with the FLSA.

A federal appellate court has rejected the argument that FLSA overtime should be based upon a higher rate that was not actually used to compute the employee's straight-time compensation.

Former unpaid Gawker Media interns will be permitted to send notices to other potential lawsuit participants.

A brief filed by the U.S. Labor Department provides some interesting insight into the agency's views about when an intern is an "employee" under the FLSA.

A Texas federal court has ordered the U.S. Labor Department to pay more than $560,000 in attorney's fees, paralegal fees, and travel expenses growing out of litigation under the FLSA.

The Third Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals is the latest to embrace broader and more employee-friendly federal principles in deciding who might be a successor to FLSA liability.

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