Main Menu

Wage and Hour Laws Blog

Posts in Compensation Generally.

A recent court decision reaffirms that properly-handled recoupments of minimum-wage supplements advanced against future commission earnings are lawful under the FLSA.

Employers should be careful when considering whether and how to use compensation-based measures as substitutes for more-direct means of managing employee conduct.

Legislation pending in the House and the Senate would radically transform federal wage-hour requirements and enforcement.

The inapt use of phrases like "pay for" might create unanticipated compensation disputes.

South Carolina employers' preparations for changes in the FLSA's "white collar" exemption regulations must take into account the state's law requiring advance notice of modifications in an employee's pay plan.

We have said for a while now that a "fluctuating workweek" pay plan might suit some employers' needs as to workers whom they will no longer treat as overtime-exempt in light of the U.S. Labor Department's coming federal Fair Labor Standards Act exemption changes.

Employers should avoid the colloquialisms "current" and "in arrears" in describing the timing of employees' wage payments.

Some employers have adopted one or more of a variety of percentage-based approaches to dealing with the FLSA overtime ramifications of bonuses.

A report advocating scheduling requirements and limitations in the District of Columbia is representative of a much-broader movement of this kind.

Employers are permitted to take cost-control concerns into account in designing a variety of new pay plans for employees who become non-exempt as the result of revisions in the U.S. Labor Department's exemption regulations.

Recent Posts

Category List

Archives

Back to Page