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South Carolina employers' preparations for changes in the FLSA's "white collar" exemption regulations must take into account the state's law requiring advance notice of modifications in an employee's pay plan.

We have said for a while now that a "fluctuating workweek" pay plan might suit some employers' needs as to workers whom they will no longer treat as overtime-exempt in light of the U.S. Labor Department's coming federal Fair Labor Standards Act exemption changes.

Employers should avoid the colloquialisms "current" and "in arrears" in describing the timing of employees' wage payments.

Some employers have adopted one or more of a variety of percentage-based approaches to dealing with the FLSA overtime ramifications of bonuses.

A report advocating scheduling requirements and limitations in the District of Columbia is representative of a much-broader movement of this kind.

Employers are permitted to take cost-control concerns into account in designing a variety of new pay plans for employees who become non-exempt as the result of revisions in the U.S. Labor Department's exemption regulations.

Management should be thinking NOW about alternative ways to pay employees who become non-exempt as the result of revisions in the U.S. Labor Department's exemption regulations.

It appears that coordinated efforts to press for legally-mandated scheduling requirements are underway.

Does the FLSA give employees a right to "predictable scheduling"?

A federal appellate court has rejected the argument that FLSA overtime should be based upon a higher rate that was not actually used to compute the employee's straight-time compensation.

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