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Wage and Hour Laws Blog

The U.S. Department of Labor projects that no proposed changes in the 2016 compensation revisions affecting the FLSA's "white collar" exemptions will be forthcoming before October 2018.

Once upon a time, a seriously-alarmed legislative body concluded that wage-hour claims and litigation had gotten out-of-hand . . .

Indications are that the U.S. Department of Labor is seriously considering retaining the Obama Administration's procedure (or something like it) for automatic "updates" to the FLSA "white collar" exemption regulations' compensation thresholds.

Employers should be careful when considering whether and how to use compensation-based measures as substitutes for more-direct means of managing employee conduct.

Legislation pending in the House and the Senate would radically transform federal wage-hour requirements and enforcement.

Employers should take steps to lower the risk of a mistaken back-pay ruling in an FLSA "failed exemption" lawsuit.

Despite what a couple of recent court decisions have suggested, it appears that neither an individual nor the U.S. Department of Labor is permitted to file an FLSA lawsuit based simply upon the "tips are always the employee's property" position that USDOL has taken.

Addressing the compelling need for authoritative U.S. Department of Labor answers to actual, day-to-day FLSA questions will be of benefit to everyone affected by or concerned with that law.

The U.S. Department of Labor has withdrawn two "Administrator Interpretations" dealing with joint-employment and independent-contractorship under the FLSA and other laws the agency enforces.

Legislation has been introduced that would ultimately more-than-double the FLSA's minimum wage from today's $7.25 an hour to $15 an hour.

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