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Wage and Hour Laws Blog

Ringing in 2018, the U.S. Department of Labor is increasing the maximum civil money penalties available for certain FLSA violations.

We have submitted an extensive response to the U.S. Department of Labor's Request for Information seeking comment regarding the 2016 compensation changes in the agency's definitions of the FLSA's so-called "white collar" exemptions.

The U.S. Labor Department has published the 2018 wage-rate floor required by Executive Order 13658, "Establishing A Minimum Wage for Contractors".  Beginning on January 1, 2018, the minimum rate will increase by 15 cents per hour to $10.35 per hour.

Judge Mazzant has granted summary judgment in favor of the employer groups who filed the lawsuit, signifying yet another setback for the so-called "Overtime Rule".

Management should take care not to focus so much upon FLSA-related "salary basis" developments that it fails to note changes in salary thresholds required under analogous state-law exemptions.

Employers should review our summary chart to be sure that they are aware of applicable state minimum-wage increases for 2017.

The U.S. Department of Labor has appealed last week's court order that prevented the salary-related changes in the FLSA's "white collar" exemptions from taking effect today.

Care and reflection are essential in deciding what to do in light of yesterday's ruling halting the salary-related "white collar" exemption changes.

Notwithstanding incomplete or over-simplified U.S. Department of Labor "guidance", employers should recognize that the FLSA overtime regular rate will almost always vary as the overtime hours worked in a workweek vary.

Two suits have been filed challenging the U.S. Labor Department's impending increases to the dollar-amount thresholds for most of the federal Fair Labor Standards Act’s so-called "white collar" exemptions.

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