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As the summer comes to a close, USDOL’s continued momentum ensures a busy fall for employers.  While we await the details, one thing is clear – employers should take these three steps right now.

USDOL has maintained a very busy agenda for the end of 2018 and the beginning of 2019, but recent action plans released by the President show that we may be in for additional, significant regulatory changes in the future.

Fisher Phillips continues to urge USDOL to publish a valid "Overtime Rule" that is practical to apply.

USDOL's latest opinion letter confirms its view that certain "gig employees" are, indeed, independent contractors.

In a much anticipated move, the Wage and Hour Division of the US Department of Labor released its Notice of Proposed Rulemaking clarifying the joint employment analysis under the Fair Labor Standards Act. The proposed regulation provides that you may not be found to be a joint employer unless you (directly or indirectly) actually exercise control over the employee, relying upon a new four-factor test. 

The USDOL has proposed to update its guidance regarding how the "regular rate" is calculated for purposes of overtime pay.

USDOL's proposed white-collar exemption changes a/k/a Overtime Rule 2.0 includes a proposed minimum salary threshold of $679 per week.  The period for public comment will close on May 21, 2019.

USDOL's long-awaited proposed white-collar exemption changes a/k/a Overtime Rule 2.0 includes a proposed minimum salary threshold of $679 per week.

Here is a handy summary of the minimum wage increases applicable to most employers in 2019, including New Jersey's new legislation.  Illinois' recent bill calls for an increase in 2020.

The USDOL has removed the infamous "20% Rule" from its Field Operations Handbook, but employers should be mindful of its disjointed approach to revisions across and within agency materials.

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