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Wage and Hour Laws Blog

Management's signing a U.S. Wage and Hour Division "Summary of Unpaid Wages" on-the-spot might complicate later challenges to the factual assumptions, reasoning, and/or legal conclusions underlying the back-wages assessed.

After more than a year, USDOL has finally disclosed at least some information concerning its "policy" of sometimes insisting that an employer pay liquidated damages as a condition of resolving alleged FLSA violations at the investigative stage.

A recent settlement emphasizes that employers must be sure they are prepared to respond appropriately to a nursing mother's request for breaks to express breastmilk.

Employers must take into account the wage-hour requirements and restrictions of all jurisdictions in which they employ tipped workers, as well as how these provisions interact with the FLSA's requirements.

The U.S. Department of Labor should disavow and withdraw statements made in 2011 that were intended to undercut the use of fluctuating-workweek pay plans under the FLSA.

Employers should keep in mind that an applicable state law might affect whether a "fluctuating workweek" arrangement is permitted for workers in that jurisdiction.

For the second time in less than a year, the U.S. Department of Labor is increasing the civil money penalties available for certain violations of the FLSA and/or related regulations.

Employers should review our summary chart to be sure that they are aware of applicable state minimum-wage increases for 2017.

Federal District Judge Amos L. Mazzant has denied the U.S. Department of Labor's request to halt proceedings in his court while it appeals the preliminary injunction he granted preventing salary-related changes in the FLSA's "white collar" exemption requirements from taking effect.

Employers are required to select and document at least one "workweek" that will apply to employees treated as falling within some FLSA exemptions.

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