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Wage and Hour Laws Blog

The U.S. House of Representatives is considering legislation that would amend the FLSA to permit private-sector employers to offer compensatory time off in lieu of monetary overtime compensation.

Employers should be encouraged to make voluntary back-wage payments with confidence that doing so will terminate their FLSA liability.

U.S. Labor Secretary candidate Alexander Acosta's March 22 confirmation hearing might have provided insight into some potential Labor Department actions affecting the FLSA and analogous federal laws.

Management's signing a U.S. Wage and Hour Division "Summary of Unpaid Wages" on-the-spot might complicate later challenges to the factual assumptions, reasoning, and/or legal conclusions underlying the back-wages assessed.

After more than a year, USDOL has finally disclosed at least some information concerning its "policy" of sometimes insisting that an employer pay liquidated damages as a condition of resolving alleged FLSA violations at the investigative stage.

A recent settlement emphasizes that employers must be sure they are prepared to respond appropriately to a nursing mother's request for breaks to express breastmilk.

Employers must take into account the wage-hour requirements and restrictions of all jurisdictions in which they employ tipped workers, as well as how these provisions interact with the FLSA's requirements.

The U.S. Department of Labor should disavow and withdraw statements made in 2011 that were intended to undercut the use of fluctuating-workweek pay plans under the FLSA.

Employers should keep in mind that an applicable state law might affect whether a "fluctuating workweek" arrangement is permitted for workers in that jurisdiction.

For the second time in less than a year, the U.S. Department of Labor is increasing the civil money penalties available for certain violations of the FLSA and/or related regulations.

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