Main Menu

Non-Compete and Trade Secrets Blog

Posts tagged Consideration.

Twas the night before Christmas, when all through the company; A disgruntled employee kept saying “please jump with me.” She was trying to line up a grand, mass departure; Of which she was certain no one could outsmart her.

A Kansas employer sees its choice-of-law provision invalidated, has to proceed under Wisconsin law, and survives to tell the tale!

On November 18, 2015, in a highly anticipated decision, the Pennsylvania Supreme Court held that employers could not use the language set forth in Pennsylvania’s Uniform Written Obligations Act (“UWOA”) to avoid providing adequate consideration for a restrictive covenant signed by an employee. In Socko v. Mid-Atlantic Systems of CPA, Inc., the Court considered whether a non-compete agreement signed by Socko with Mid-Atlantic following the ...

Previously, we have written about the Top Ten Things to do When an Employee Resigns to Join a Competitor and the Top Ten Mistakes Made by Departing Employees. Given the favorable feedback, we continue with the following Top Ten Things to Consider When Drafting a Non-Compete Agreement.

For companies with employees in multiple jurisdictions, creating a single non-compete agreement for use by employees throughout the country can be tempting, yet potentially ineffective. The following issues may vary from state to state and should be considered when determining how many agreements a company needs and how to maximize the prospect for enforcement.

As with any contract, to be enforceable, a non-compete must be supported by consideration. The Colorado Supreme Court recently fell in line with the clear majority position by finding that continued employment alone is sufficient consideration.

Employers and employees alike often ask how much consideration is required to support a non-compete. A recent case suggests that a Garden Leave clause -- a promise to pay the employee's salary for the duration of the non-compete -- is adequate.

Good mergers can turn bad without attention to employee retention -- be sure to carefully analyze the existence and enforcability of non-competes signed by key employees early in the process.

Many employers with offices or employees located in multiple states use the same non-compete/confidentiality agreement in each state in which they do business. Typically, the form of the non-compete/confidentiality agreement originated in the employer’s home state, and the employer went on to use this same agreement wherever the employer does business. However, these employers may find out too late that a non-compete/confidentiality agreement enforceable in their home state may not be enforceable in another state.

Recent Posts

Category List

Archives

Back to Page