Main Menu

Non-Compete and Trade Secrets Blog

On November 18, 2015, in a highly anticipated decision, the Pennsylvania Supreme Court held that employers could not use the language set forth in Pennsylvania’s Uniform Written Obligations Act (“UWOA”) to avoid providing adequate consideration for a restrictive covenant signed by an employee. In Socko v. Mid-Atlantic Systems of CPA, Inc., the Court considered whether a non-compete agreement signed by Socko with Mid-Atlantic following the ...

Last month, the Connecticut state legislature passed a bill that would have regulated the use of noncompete agreements. A few days ago, the bill died on the Governor's desk.

Previously, we have written about the Top Ten Things to do When an Employee Resigns to Join a Competitor and the Top Ten Mistakes Made by Departing Employees. Given the favorable feedback, we continue with the following Top Ten Things to Consider When Drafting a Non-Compete Agreement.

For companies with employees in multiple jurisdictions, creating a single non-compete agreement for use by employees throughout the country can be tempting, yet potentially ineffective. The following issues may vary from state to state and should be considered when determining how many agreements a company needs and how to maximize the prospect for enforcement.

A case pending in New York federal court provides a reminder of important lessons for professionals in the food services and restaurant industry regarding employee defection and trade secrets issues.

Recent Posts

Category List

Archives

Back to Page