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Employment Privacy Blog

News, commentary, and legal updates from attorneys in the Data Security and Workplace Privacy Practice Group at Fisher Phillips.
Posts tagged Workplace Privacy.

For the second year in a row, the Washington legislature failed to pass an ambitious consumer privacy protection bill into law.

Many small or solo franchisees, subsidiaries, and affiliates of larger businesses may think the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA), does not apply to your separate business entity because it does not meet one of the three threshold criteria for CCPA coverage: (1) your annual revenue is under $25 million; (2) you do not annually collect the personal information of 50,000 or more California residents, households or devices; and (3) you are not in the business of selling information. But upon closer inspection, you may be disappointed to learn that California’s groundbreaking new privacy law, which became effective January 1, 2020, may yet still apply to you based on a potentially broad "control" test.

Governor Gavin Newsom just signed into law two amendments to the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) that will have a direct impact on employers doing business in the state. The new amendments, signed on October 11, 2019 and taking effect on January 1, 2020, require covered businesses meeting a certain revenue threshold or other criteria to implement policies and procedures that provide consumers – which includes employees – certain privacy rights not previously available under existing law.

Last Friday, Snapchat (which recently changed its name to Snap, Inc.) announced the coming release of its newest product: “Spectacles” - brightly colored, fun-looking sunglasses with a built-in camera that records videos in 10-second increments (which can be combined to form a video of up to 30-seconds in length) with the touch of a button. The videos can be stored in the sunglasses until a later time or uploaded to the user’s phone for immediate sharing with friends. The glasses are expected to retail for $130 which is only about one-tenth the price of the virtually defunct Google Glass, making Spectacles a product likely to be much more accessible to the average employee. Why does this matter to employers? Because it’s the latest challenge to companies striving to implement more secure data protection and privacy protocols in the workplace.

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