Main Menu

Cross Border Employer Blog

Posts tagged Cross-border.

The International Employers Forum welcomed Anna Cozzi, Esquire, from Daverio & Florio law firm, to join a panel of international lawyers, including my colleague William Wright, to speak about changes in employment law around the world.  Fisher Phillips thanks Anna for kindly accepting our invitation to answer a few questions about the new smart working arrangements in Italy for the Cross Border Blog.

Uber drivers in the UK are “workers” entitled to earn at least the national minimum wage and enjoy other statutory benefits and protections an Employment Appeals Tribunal (“EAT”) held on November 9, upholding the decision of the Employment Tribunal (“ET”) in the case of Uber B.V. & Ors v. Islam & Ors UKEAT/0056/17/DA. The ramifications of this decision are huge: Uber’s costs will increase significantly to cover drivers’ pay and benefits and Uber will have to revise its contracts, and the tens of thousands of Uber drivers will enjoy workers’ rights and protections previously unavailable to them. This decision sends a cautionary message to any enterprise with a similar business model to Uber with self-employed workforces. These businesses would be well advised to re-examine their relationship with all persons classified as independent self-employed contractors.

Unless you have been living under a rock, you know that the United States has had a new president for about six months: Mr. Donald J. Trump. Many suggest (and I do not take a position on this) that President Trump was catapulted to success by certain attitudes on race, religion, and immigration. An important disclaimer – this is not a blog post about politics (there are plenty of those already). Instead, it is a blog post about how you, an employer, can avoid claims of race, national origin or religious discrimination in this new Trump Era.

Vermont Governor Peter Shumlin and the Department of Public Safety issued a new policy for the Vermont State Police which impacts when the State Police are allowed to question a person’s immigration status.

Managing non-compete and trade secret issues on a multi-national basis isn’t just a problem for Fortune 500 companies. Tune in for our series of blog posts on the emerging challenge of managing non-compete and trade secrets issues when operating in a multi-national environment.

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) continues to make good on its promise to audit employer’s I-9 forms to ensure compliance with federal immigration laws. ICE served another round of I-9 Notices of Inspection (NOIs) to 1,000 businesses nationwide.

On April 23, 2010, Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer signed into law the toughest immigration law in the country, which makes it a misdemeanor for an individual to lack proper immigration paperwork in Arizona. Local police who have "reasonable suspicion" that an individual is undocumented now have the authority to determine that person's immigration status. Under current law, officers may only inquire about immigration status if the person is a suspect in another crime.

Recent Posts

Category List

Archives

Back to Page