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Posts by Samina Weil

Fisher Phillips attorneys had the pleasure and privilege of presenting with Jingo Lu, Esquire, a lawyer from China, at a recent International Employers Forum event in Washington D.C.  Jingbo kindly accepted our invitation to answer some of questions about employment relationships in China. More particularly, we will delve into how employment relationships may be legally terminated in China, a jurisdiction that requires employers to have cause to terminate an employee.

New Zealand’s Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern and partner Clark Gayford are expecting their first child in June 2018, just shy of the July 1 effective date of a new law extending the period of paid parental leave from 18 to 22 weeks. The Parental Leave and Employment Protection Amendment Bill, passed on November 30, 2017 extends the period of paid parental leave from 18 to 26 weeks by July 1, 2020. The government’s expressed aim is to support working families, reduce financial stress, and to allow for more bonding time for care givers who are not in a position to take any unpaid leave.

When a US company decides to hire an employee in another country the question of whether to send the applicant an offer letter inevitably arises. Sending an offer letter prior to the final contract is normal practice in the US.  But this is not the case in other jurisdictions, and for good reason. 

The International Employers Forum welcomed Anna Cozzi, Esquire, from Daverio & Florio law firm, to join a panel of international lawyers, including my colleague William Wright, to speak about changes in employment law around the world.  Fisher Phillips thanks Anna for kindly accepting our invitation to answer a few questions about the new smart working arrangements in Italy for the Cross Border Blog.

Mexican workers earning at the minimum wage level will enjoy a 10% pay increase effective December 2017. The minimum wage in Mexico will rise from approximately 80.04 pesos (4.28 USD) to 88.36 pesos (4.73 USD) per day

Fisher Phillips attorneys had the pleasure and privilege of presenting with Colleen Cleary, Esquire, a solicitor from Ireland, at an International Employers Forum event in Washington D.C. She kindly accepted our invitation to answer some of our questions about the practical application of the Protected Disclosures Act 2014 (the “Act”) in Ireland over the past four years. The Act provides a statutory framework within which workers from all sectors may raise concerns about potential wrongdoing in the workplace (“whistleblowing”) with the knowledge that there are legal protections upon which they may rely if they are penalized by their employer or suffer another form of detriment as a consequence of speaking out. 

Uber drivers in the UK are “workers” entitled to earn at least the national minimum wage and enjoy other statutory benefits and protections an Employment Appeals Tribunal (“EAT”) held on November 9, upholding the decision of the Employment Tribunal (“ET”) in the case of Uber B.V. & Ors v. Islam & Ors UKEAT/0056/17/DA. The ramifications of this decision are huge: Uber’s costs will increase significantly to cover drivers’ pay and benefits and Uber will have to revise its contracts, and the tens of thousands of Uber drivers will enjoy workers’ rights and protections previously unavailable to them. This decision sends a cautionary message to any enterprise with a similar business model to Uber with self-employed workforces. These businesses would be well advised to re-examine their relationship with all persons classified as independent self-employed contractors.

This year, India became one of the most generous providers of maternity benefits in the world when it extended the period of maternity leave available to eligible working mothers from twelve (12) weeks to twenty-six (26) weeks – a drastic jump. In addition to other changes, India introduced maternity benefits for eligible adoptive and commissioning mothers (the biological mother of a child carried by a surrogate).

On September 24, 2015, the National Minimum Wage Commission resolved that a single minimum wage of $70.10 pesos a day would apply across the entire country of Mexico. This resolution became effective as of October 1, 2015. Previously, for the purposes of minimum wage, Mexico was divided into two geographic areas – A and B. The September resolution brought the minimum wage for geographic area B, previously set at $68.28 pesos a day, up to $70.10 pesos a ...

If you employ or plan to employ workers in the European Union who have no habitual or fixed place of work, you should be aware of a recent ruling of the European Court of Justice (“ECJ”). The ECJ determined in September that “working time” for such peripatetic workers includes travel time from home to the first designated customer and back home from the last designated customer.

The issue arose in the case of Federacion de Servicios Privados del ...

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