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Cross Border Employer Blog

It has been fewer than 100 days since Donald J. Trump became the 45th President of the United States of America. In this short time, there has been a flurry of immigration-related activity, which has caused the national conversation on immigration to reach a fever pitch. While discussions about “sanctuary cities” or the “travel ban” are certainly worth having, only one of the topics de jour has the potential to have an immediate impact on your workforce: ICE raids. Advanced preparation and proper response are key to ensuring that your business does not become part of the conversation. 

This summer I wrote about the dangers of English-only policies in this age of multiculturalism (for more, click here). These policies tend to emerge more frequently in the healthcare workplace, the reason being – the provision of quality care is the utmost goal and sometimes that requires everyone to speak the same language. But, what happens when it is the patient who is culturally diverse from the workforce? What must healthcare providers do in response? The Department of Health and Human Services has the answer: covered entities must provide language services to people whose primary language is not English in a more robust way than ever before.

The United States has long been referred to as a melting pot. But, some commentators challenge this notion, offering instead that the United States is more akin to a meal of separate and diverse ingredients; an orchestra of individual musicians who together create a symphony.  While members of the United States’ many ethnic groups still engage in some assimilation – namely the adoption of the English language – they need not totally abandon their cultural heritage in order to fit into the framework of today’s America. This is multiculturalism.

Human trafficking is a growing problem in the United States and abroad. Although the common assumption is that human trafficking involves sex, it can also involve labor. According to the Office on Trafficking in Persons, a Department within the United States Department of Health and Human Services, labor trafficking takes place in various contexts. From domestic servitude to small businesses, from factories to agricultural work, trafficked ...

According to many sources, there is a shortage of unskilled workers in the United States that is only projected to worsen, and employers nationwide are feeling the pinch. From hoteliers to seafood processors, manufacturers to contractors, employers are often finding it more and more difficult to fill open positions. As a result, many employers have turned to foreign workers. But, let’s face it – processing visa applications is complex and the penalties associated with the employment of unauthorized workers are too great. Looking for the easiest and most efficient solution, many employers have simply outsourced the hassle.

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