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Cross Border Employer Blog

Posts from April 2016.

On March 3, 2016, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) launched a pilot program called “Known Employer” to streamline the process by which employers who sponsor foreign national workers send documents and information to the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). The program utilizes an online platform that allows certain employers who regularly file petitions with the agency to submit one set of corporate documentation and information about the employer’s business for preliminary adjudication by the agency, thereby eliminating the need to submit the same set of documents for each application. The pilot program is currently only open to certain preselected employers. If successful after the scheduled one-year trial period, DHS may expand the program.

This article is the third in a series which provides an overview of the basics of employment law in Austria and will focus on the legal requirements applicable to employee termination procedures.

Britain and the EU have traditionally had a distant relationship, with Britain often choosing to keep an arm’s length from its continental partners. This inclination may soon become a political reality when the UK votes on whether to stay in the EU this June. In spite of this historical distance, many labor and employment laws in the UK such as those relating to maternity and paternity leave, discrimination, and work time bear the imprimatur of EU directives. Given Britain’s history with the European Union, it might appear that if the UK leaves the EU, changes in this area of the law will be broad and swift. However, the reality is that despite grumbling of bureaucratic red tape from Brussels, many of these laws have become integrated into British life, and should a “Brexit” occur, changes are likely to be gradual and narrowly tailored.

Starting May 10, 2016, a new regulation published last month by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) takes effect which increases the work authorization extension period from 17 to 24 months for F-1 students holding U.S. degrees in a designated Science, Technology, Engineering or Math (STEM) field. 

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