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Cross Border Employer Blog

Posts from April 2015.

On April 15, 2015, former employee Steven Heldt sued Tata Consultancy Services, Ltd. in United States District Court for the Northern District of California for discrimination. Tata is multinational corporation headquartered in Mumbai, India with 19 offices in the United States that provides consulting, technology, and outsourcing services. Heldt alleges that “approximately 95% of Tata’s United States workforce is of South Asian ...

So your company is expanding and, for the first time, and you’ll be sending key employees abroad to work in other markets. While the opportunities for expansion may appear limitless, so is your potential liability for failing to protect your employees from the myriad problems they may face while traveling on business. While some risks may appear obvious, such as the Ebola virus in West Africa, or kidnapping in Syria or fighting in Ukraine, there are other, less obvious risks such as an employee falling in the shower or suffering from a poisonous insect bite. In addition to personal safety risks, your employee could face border hassles or even detention for failing to have the proper travel documents, vaccinations or visas. As an employer, you have a legal and moral duty to protect employees from harm while traveling for business. A little advance planning can help you avoid or mitigate any emergencies that might occur.

According to many sources, there is a shortage of unskilled workers in the United States that is only projected to worsen, and employers nationwide are feeling the pinch. From hoteliers to seafood processors, manufacturers to contractors, employers are often finding it more and more difficult to fill open positions. As a result, many employers have turned to foreign workers. But, let’s face it – processing visa applications is complex and the penalties associated with the employment of unauthorized workers are too great. Looking for the easiest and most efficient solution, many employers have simply outsourced the hassle.

On February 20, 2015, Italy approved significant but controversial reforms to Article 18 of Italy’s Workers’ Statute of 1970 in an attempt to combat soaring unemployment, currently 42% among workers under the age of 29 and 12.8% overall, and facilitate growth in an otherwise stagnant economy. The reforms, referred to as the “Jobs Act” (“Jobs Act” or “reforms”) were implemented by several Legislative Decrees and based upon the ...

This article is the second in a series which will provide an introduction to employment law in Indonesia and will cover the basic laws applicable to terms of employment, specifically wage & hour law, medical leave, and termination of employment.

Wage and Hour
Maximum work hours may be either:

  • A forty-hour work week of eight hour days over five working days; or
  • A forty-hour work week of seven hour days over six working days.

Indonesia uses a “Basic ...

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